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NJ Walks and Bikes

BPRC Goes to TRB

BPRC Goes to TRB

In January, staff from the NJ Bicycle and Pedestrian Resource Center (BPRC) attended the 92nd Annual Transportation Research Board (TRB) Conference held in Washington D.C. The conference features more than 4,000 presentations that address a wide range of topics in transportation policy and practice. Bicycle and Pedestrian topics have been gaining momentum at the conference with capacity crowds attending some of the more popular sessions. For this year’s conference we have compiled a few papers we thought were interesting and wanted to share! While the Conference does offer many more studies than what we have provided here, these 6 reports highlight a small sample of the valuable research presented at the TRB Conference. Click the “Read More” link to read more about each of the selected publications.

“I Want My Complete Streets”: A Statewide Effort To Make Our Streets Safer and Our Communities Healthier and More Economically Sustainable

“I Want My Complete Streets”: A Statewide Effort To Make Our Streets Safer and Our Communities Healthier and More Economically Sustainable

One quality of life issue that unites people of all ages is the need for safer streets. Professionals from pediatricians to gerontologists know that to live and feel healthy, Americans need to be spending more time outdoors, walking or biking several times a week for common activities like short trips to the store. Streets that accommodate such active living are called “Complete Streets” (CS), and municipalities that want to take advantage of grants and initiatives to improve safety, health, and economic vitality are well-advised to adopt CS policies that make it easier to connect their residents with places they’d like to go.

The Top 10 Ways to Encourage Bicycling Among College Students

The Top 10 Ways to Encourage Bicycling Among College Students

Whether due to health benefits, environmental factors, or financial reasons, more people are becoming bicycle commuters. In fact, cycling has grown in popularity as a primary means of transportation throughout the past decade. The US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) reports that there were nearly twice as many bicycle commuters in 2009 than 2000. In New Jersey alone, between 2007 and 2011, the number of people who rode their bike to work increased by 16.59% [i].

The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) has recognized these trends throughout the state, and has been working with municipalities to provide residents with opportunities to use alternative modes of transportation. Similarly, they have also provided assistance to municipalities in the form of bicycle and pedestrian planning; these municipalities include some of the state’s higher education facilities such as Richard Stockton College in Galloway Township and Stevens Institute of Technology in the City of Hoboken. Additionally, New Jersey’s eight TMA’s provide a great deal of assistance to cyclists. By providing bicycle racks at transit stops, or assisting riders in identifying the most suitable roads for commuting to work or school on a bike, the TMA’s serve as a valuable resource for a budding cyclist looking to make “the switch.”