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Complete Streets

Sustainable Complete Streets

Sustainable Complete Streets

Complete Street initiatives “redefine what a street is intended to do, what goals a transportation agency is going to meet, and how the community will spend its transportation money.”[1] These policies stress the need to make transportation accommodations for all modes: bicycles, pedestrians, automobiles, and freight. While Complete Streets works to change the transportation landscape, it also has the potential…read more →

Our Top Bicycle and Pedestrian Moments of 2013

The Bicycle and Pedestrian Resource Center is proud to present our favorite moments in active transportation news from New Jersey in 2013, in no particular order. From becoming the leader in Complete Streets to providing communities with new resources to improve bicycle and pedestrian safety, 2013 was a great year for walking and biking in New Jersey.

Coverage of the 2013 Complete Streets Summit

Hosted by the Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center with support from the New Jersey Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, and the New Jersey Chapter of the American Planning Association, the 2013 Complete Streets Summit was held on the New Brunswick campus of Rutgers University on October 21, 2013.  A variety of Complete Streets related topics were covered throughout the…read more →

Scenes from Ciclovia

Scenes from Ciclovia

On Sunday, October 6, thousands of New Brunswick residents and visitors took to the streets in the city’s first-ever Ciclovia. A 3.4 mile route through the heart of the city was closed to car traffic in order to give the community the opportunity to walk, bike, skate, run, and take fitness classes in the streets. The New Brunswick Ciclovia was…read more →

2013 NJ Complete Streets Summit

2013 NJ Complete Streets Summit

On Monday October 21st, 300 elected officials, planners, and engineers from throughout New Jersey assembled in New Brunswick for the 2013 Complete Streets Summit. The Summit – hosted by the Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center with support from the New Jersey Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, and the New Jersey Chapter of the American Planning Association – took place…read more →

“I Want My Complete Streets”: A Statewide Effort To Make Our Streets Safer and Our Communities Healthier and More Economically Sustainable

“I Want My Complete Streets”: A Statewide Effort To Make Our Streets Safer and Our Communities Healthier and More Economically Sustainable

One quality of life issue that unites people of all ages is the need for safer streets. Professionals from pediatricians to gerontologists know that to live and feel healthy, Americans need to be spending more time outdoors, walking or biking several times a week for common activities like short trips to the store. Streets that accommodate such active living are called “Complete Streets” (CS), and municipalities that want to take advantage of grants and initiatives to improve safety, health, and economic vitality are well-advised to adopt CS policies that make it easier to connect their residents with places they’d like to go.

NJ DOT Unveils new Website for Complete Streets

NJ DOT Unveils new Website for Complete Streets

Today, the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) unveiled their new Complete Streets Website! Here policy makers, advocates, and residents can all come to understand more about Complete Streets and see the progress NJDOT is making in implementing the policy though its own roadway projects. The site also provides a great deal of transparency in the Complete Streets process by listing the exemptions procedures and identifying those projects that have received an exemption.

Head on over to the new site today! http://www.state.nj.us/transportation/eng/completestreets/

Bicycle and Pedestrian Considerations in the Development and Design Review Process: Options for New Jersey Municipalities

Bicycle and Pedestrian Considerations in the Development and Design Review Process: Options for New Jersey Municipalities

More and more New Jersey municipalities are recognizing the benefits of being a bicycle and pedestrian friendly community. In addition to easing roadway congestion, making walking and biking a viable transportation mode for both utilitarian and recreational trips has environmental and social benefits as well. Biking and walking allows for healthier communities by providing opportunities for exercise, by contributing to a more egalitarian and connected transportation system, and by providing opportunities for community interaction and sense of place. This positive change is being fostered in New Jersey communities at all levels of government, but no player can have a greater impact in changing a community than the community itself. The following article, identifies some of the way communities can bring about these types of changes to New Jersey’s already crowded streets.