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BPRC Releases Complete Streets Case Studies

BPRC Releases Complete Streets Case Studies

The New Jersey Bicycle and Pedestrian Resource Center is pleased to announce the release of three Complete Streets Case Studies, highlighting the accomplishments of Somerville Borough, Cherry Hill Township, and Passaic County in implementing Complete Streets projects that enhance the safety and mobility of all road users. The purpose of these case studies, funded by the New Jersey Department of Transportation, is to understand the process that has led to successful implementation, and understand the challenges faced along the way. Together, this information can inspire and inform other municipalities and counties in New Jersey working towards providing safer transportation options for all road users.

In 2009, the New Jersey Department of Transportation adopted a Complete Streets policy which defined a Complete Street as one designed to provide safe access for all users by implementing a comprehensive integrated multi-modal network of transportation options. The benefits include increased safety for all users, connections between origins and destinations, and the promotion of healthier and more livable communities. Since the policy’s adoption, Complete Streets has built momentum throughout the state. As of April, 2016, 8 counties and 135 municipalities have followed the lead and adopted their own local Complete Streets policy.

Division Street Pedestrian Mall, Somerville New Jersey

Division Street Pedestrian Mall, Somerville New Jersey

The Borough of Somerville is quickly becoming a destination for new residents and businesses, and Complete Streets are an integral part of their economic development formula. Complete Streets are being used to encourage new growth by appealing to millennials and boomers looking for a safe, walkable community. Complete Streets help to strengthen the small town character of the municipality, and enhance what existing residents love about their borough. Success stories include Division Street, a new pedestrian mall; new sidewalks and a reduction of lanes on Veterans Memorial Drive; redevelopment projects providing new walking destinations; and a trail network creating regional connections.

A "road diet" on a rural road in Passaic County enhanced safety for all road users

A “road diet” on a rural road in Passaic County enhanced safety for all road users

Passaic County has land uses ranging from densely populated urban centers to rural protected lands, and county planners and engineers have worked together to provide context-appropriate, yet flexible, planning and engineering guidelines which have created new links for bicyclists and pedestrians. Success stories include “road-diets,” bicycle lanes, and shared lane markings on rural county roadways; the Passaic County Courthouse Plaza, which transformed a street into a beautiful pedestrian plaza; and the Morris Canal Greenway, which connects a variety of municipalities with multi-use trails.

Brand new sidewalks and bicycle lanes in Cherry Hill

Brand new sidewalks and bicycle lanes in Cherry Hill

Cherry Hill Township, which is an iconic suburban town with oversized roadways designed for auto-dependent lifestyles, has shown ways to retrofit these road networks to accommodate all users. Success stories include the Springdale road diet, which incorporates traffic calming, new sidewalks, and bicycle lanes, and linking an established network of county multi-use trails with on-road shared-use bicycle markings.

A copy of the full reports can be downloaded through these links:

Somerville: http://njbikeped.org/portfolio/complete-streets-case-study-somerville-new-jersey-2016/

Passaic County: http://njbikeped.org/portfolio/complete-streets-case-study-passaic-county-new-jersey-2016/

Cherry Hill: http://njbikeped.org/portfolio/complete-street-case-study-cherry-hill-nj-2016/

The New Jersey Bicycle and Pedestrian Resource Center (BPRC) assists public officials, transportation and health professionals, and the public in creating a safer and more accessible walking and bicycling environment through primary research, education, and dissemination of information about best practices in policy and design. The Center is supported by the New Jersey Department of Transportation through funds provided by the Federal Highway Administration.